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About PLC

PRLC Course Descriptions

  • PRLC 1810: Individual Leadership and Ethics (3 credits; meets A&S Ideals and Values Core Requirement)
    • Course Description: PRLC 1810 introduces students to the fundamental principles of leadership, ethics, and critical thinking that should establish the foundation of their subsequent PLC program, academic, and personal development.   Students should gain an understanding of themselves and how they might collaborate and interact with, and lead others.  Students should gain experience in making arguments and presenting their positions verbally and in writing.  Students should be able to appreciate the symbiotic relationship between leadership, personal ethical reasoning, and critical thinking.
  • PRLC 1820: Community Issues in Leadership (3 credits; meets A&S Contemporary Societies Core Requirement)
    • Course Description: PRLC 1820 challenges students to think about the dynamics within and among communities, and how leaders work to build and sustain healthy communities.  Students should gain an understanding of how communities are conceptualized, the underlying realities that challenge communities and how committed leaders are addressing those challenges.  Students should apply their critical thinking skills, ethical reasoning, and foundational leadership knowledge gained in PRLC 1810.  Students will also join with a community partner to address a real-world challenge utilising design theory and practices.
  • PRLC 2820: Multi-Level Issues in Leadership (3 credits)
    • Course Description: Multi-Level Issues in Leadership is designed to put the student’s learning process into hyperdrive!  Building on 1810 and 1820’s foundation of inquiry, communication and collaboration skills, PRLC 2820 moves at a challenging pace of weekly cycles of research, analysis, critique and revision. Each student chooses a topic—a “complex social problem”—of interest and importance to them. Throughout the semester, the topic is scrutinized each week through different “lenses”, from illuminating how it manifests at the level of the individual human being, to how it is perceived in different cultures, to how it relates to complex global systems.  Each lens requires not only new research conducted by different methods (e.g. secondary research, interviews) but also expression of analysis by different modes (e.g. written narratives, visual models, oral presentations). Students critique one anothers’ work each week and also meet in discussions to focus on the personal leadership implications of each week’s lens.  At the end of the semester, each student completes a meaningful final project of their choice and submits a portfolio of the entire semester’s work.  Students graduate from PRLC 2820 equipped to lead with greater agility, grit and expertise about especially compelling and complex social issues.
  •  PRLC 3810: Global Issues in Leadership (3 credits)
    • Course Description: This course examines leadership in a dynamic 21st century world.  It is designed to help students think broadly about global issues and continue their preparation for leadership positions in business, government, and non-profit organizations.  The course is focused on improving personal leadership skills and emphasizes the importance of always leading consistently with the highest ethical principles and values.  The course will involve some leadership and management theories, but throughout it emphasizes how to apply them in the real world.  By combining practical examples with theory, and what works with what does not, the course will provide useful guidelines for students who want to be leaders of the future. Global Issues is organized around seven major global flows: population, energy, security, investment, disease, illegal drugs, and terrorism. Each topic includes a guest lecture, and an overview taught by teams of students. Five of the seven topics also include a case study. To round out the class, Professor Riggle provides five general leadership lectures. To support the lecture material, there are assigned readings and other assignments, both individual and team-oriented.
  • PRLC 3800: Global Inquiry for 21st Century Leaders (3 credits)
    • Course Description: T Global Inquiry for 21st Century Leaders introduces students to the ways in which leadership and sustainable development theory converge, challenges students to examine these issues in specific contexts around the world, and will provide them with practical training in cross-cultural competency and leadership skills that they will then carry into the world when they engage with citizens and countries beyond the United States. Students apply the principle concepts of Global Inquiry—sustainable development, cross-cultural awareness, and global leadership—as they conceptualize and craft a personal research project within their area of study. The Global Inquiry Course takes a broad and interdisciplinary approach to sustainable development including concepts and strategies such as social entrepreneurship, environmental engineering, and social and environmental planning.
  • LEAD 4000: Leadership Capstone (4 credits)
    • Course Description: The Capstone Leadership course was created by the university to be a culminating experience that unites student leaders to share and synthesize insights and skills.  The course is intended for students nearing the end of their undergraduate experience, offering the opportunity to reflect upon and actively apply the leadership skills and virtues they have developed throughout their time at CU—Boulder. “Capstone” is designed around two interconnected dimensions—reflection and action—and involves intensive, semester-long group work and a series of reflective discussions and guided journal exercises.  For PLCers, Capstone provides a context of support by offering very practical support (for example in creating the final portfolio and preparing post-graduation plans) and personal support (for example in creating space for introspection, discernment and deep friendship).

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